The Twilight Years of Neptune

Avatar Author: zxvasdf an implosion of thought Read Bio

Neptune was an old man. When his bones ached, he slept in the warm seas of Earth, a narrow opening in the water snaking to the surface so he could breathe. Such was his mastery over the one of the most singular elementals, he could do it in his sleep.

Tourists took cruise ships to the Indian Ocean where a faithful reproduction of the Taj Mahal shimmered, compromised entirely of water.Schools of fish flashed along its walls, whirled in the minarets.

The Aleutian City was a gift to the great Eskimos, in regard of their valiant assistance when the long dormant Behemoth from Space sprang from the North Pole. The city was a sprawling conglomerate of dome upon dome, resembling soap bubbles.

Original art that dwarfed Mt. Rushmore jeweled the long stretch of the Atlantic ocean. A vast market sank into the surf in North Carolina, a gigantic air bubble of commerce. In Vegas a towering champagne glass of water effervesced with swimming children.

They all wondered what would happen to all the water when Neptune died.

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Comments (4 so far!)

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  1. Avatar Robert Quick

    I see him here as kind of an old version of Magneto, the one who had given up his war to concentrate on the future (at least for a while). Older, wiser, and complete at peace with himself.

    Great addition!

  2. Ahfl_icon THX 0477

    Interesting idea with some cool visuals. Not sure what we would do with the old gods these days.

  3. Avatar Lighty

    This is wonderful! I love the descriptions of each monument, and “when his bones ached, he slept in the warm seas of the Earth” is a great line.

  4. Avatar As Large as Alone

    I really like this!

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